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Our Favorite Training Tools for Reactivity.

Here at K9 Turbo Training, we work with a lot of reactive dogs (dogs who bark and lunge on leash when faced with a trigger, such as another dog, bikes, skateboards, etc.). Having the right tools when working with a reactive dog can make the experience much easier for both the handler and the dog. Here are some of our favorites.


Freedom Harness

This is hands down our favorite harness for any dog. With two points of contact for both safety and control, a soft under strap, and a variety of sizes for dogs of all shapes and sizes, this harness makes it easier than ever to discourage pulling in a humane and non-invasive manner.

The Freedom Harness will truly change the way that you feel about walking your dog, and at only $29.99, you'll wonder why you didn't get one sooner.




Baskerville Muzzle

Muzzles are an important tool for keeping both dog and handler safe in sticky situations. We especially love the Baskerville Muzzle for both it's style and durability. The basket style allows the dog to pant and drink water, while the forehead strap ensures that the muzzle cannot be pulled off.

We know that using a muzzle may seem a bit intimidating at first, but rest assured that the muzzle is not a punishment- in fact, when muzzle training is done properly, it can be a ton of fun! Just like with a leash, the dog will associate the muzzle with having an awesome time- it isn't scary at all! Here's a great video to get you started on muzzle training your pup.

If you look closely at the photo above, you'll notice that Armando is wearing a Freedom Harness, too!


Treat Pouch

See that black and grey pouch that Kylo Ren's mom is rocking? That's a Petsafe treat pouch, and it's about to make your life way easier. Having treats on hand during walks makes walks much easier for you and your dog. Rewarding your dog for seeing things that scare or frustrate them helps to create a positive association to the trigger and massively decreases reactivity and frustration. But for that, you need to carry treats. This beautiful piece of equipment makes it happen and once you have one, you'll never look back. It's easily one of the most important training tools you'll ever purchase, we guarantee it.

With both a waist strap and a pocket clip, it's super easy to carry, and with multiple lined pouches, you can stuff it full of treats, poop bags, clickers, and anything else you may need as you train. It even comes in multiple colors to match your wardrobe.


Hands Free Leash

We get it- trying to juggle a leash, a clicker, and treats while focusing on your dog is hard. A hands-free leash makes things easier by attaching securely to the handler's waist and acts as a second point of contact while on walks. Similar to a seat belt, this tool dramatically increases safety in the event of an emergency with a reactive dog. Giving full control and security, this leash will be there just in case you dropped your first leash or it was pulled out of your hand. Keep your dog safe and always walk with two points of contact!


"In Training" Vest

If you want to give yourself a huge advantage while training, consider using an "In Training" Vest. This is a bold, visual indication to people around you that your dog is working and needs space. It comes in a variety of colors, just in case you want to color coordinate all of your dog's accessories. We love these for walking with dogs that need a little bit more space from dogs or people.


Window Film

Dog making you crazy barking at windows and doors? For many reactive dogs, seeing other dogs or people walking by the house can be an incredibly stressful experience for both the dog and the humans that live in the home.

Window Film is an inexpensive, easy way to prevent reactions to outside triggers while still allowing plenty of sunlight into the house. Easy to apply, easy to remove. And you'll regret that you didn't do it sooner. These can be found at Home Depot, Lowe's or online (be sure you look for the opeque version).


Author: Margo Butler, CPDT-KA

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